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Acta Paediatr. 2019 Jan 27. doi: 10.1111/apa.14728. [Epub ahead of print]

Lifestyle factors during acute Epstein-Barr virus infection in adolescents predict physical activity six months later.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
2
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
3
Section of Specialized Endocrinology, Department of Endocrinology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
4
Department of Microbiology and Infectional Control, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
5
Department of Immunology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
6
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
7
Fürst Medical Laboratory, Lørenskog, Norway.
8
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
9
Research Division, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.

Abstract

AIM:

Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a trigger of prolonged fatigue. This study investigated baseline predictors of physical activity six months after an acute EBV infection.

METHODS:

A total of 200 adolescents (12-20 years old) with acute EBV infection were assessed for 149 possible baseline predictors and followed prospectively. In this exploratory study, we performed linear regression analysis to assess possible associations between baseline predictors and steps per day at six months.

RESULTS:

In the final multiple linear regression model, physical activity six months after acute EBV infection was significantly and independently predicted by baseline physical activity (steps per day), substance use (alcohol and illicit drugs) and human growth hormone (adjusted R2  = 0.20).

CONCLUSION:

Baseline physical activity, substance use and plasma growth hormone are independent predictors of physical activity six months after an acute EBV infection in adolescents, whereas markers of the infection and associated immune response do not seem to be associated with physical activity six months later.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Chronic fatigue; Epstein-Barr virus infection; Physical activity

PMID:
30685875
DOI:
10.1111/apa.14728

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