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Neuroscience. 2019 May 21;407:182-191. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.01.020. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Effects of Non-traumatic Noise and Conductive Hearing Loss on Auditory System Function.

Author information

1
Dept of Otolaryngology-HNS, Center for Hearing and Balance, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States.
2
Dept. Psychology, University at Buffalo, SUNY, United States.
3
Dept. Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo, SUNY, United States.
4
Dept. Biological Sciences, University at Buffalo, SUNY, United States. Electronic address: mx@buffalo.edu.

Abstract

The effects of traumatic noise-exposure and deafening on auditory system function have received a great deal of attention. However, lower levels of noise as well as temporary conductive hearing loss also have consequences on auditory physiology and hearing. Here we review how abnormal acoustic experience at early ages affects the ascending and descending auditory pathways, as well as hearing behavior.

KEYWORDS:

audiogenic seizure; conductive hearing loss; olivocochlear system; synaptic physiology; tinnitus

PMID:
30685543
PMCID:
PMC6513692
[Available on 2020-05-21]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.01.020

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