Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mol Cell Neurosci. 2019 Mar;95:43-50. doi: 10.1016/j.mcn.2019.01.006. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Stem cells in animal models of Huntington disease: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Neuropsychiatry Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: Gabriela.D.Colpo@uth.tmc.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Neuropsychiatry Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder encoding a mutant form of the huntingtin protein (HTT). HD is pathologically characterized by loss of neurons in the striatum and cortex, which leads to progressive motor dysfunction, cognitive decline and behavioral symptoms. Stem cell-based therapy has emerged as a feasible therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and may be effective in alleviating and/or halting the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HD. Several pre-clinical studies have used stem cells in animal models of HD. Here, we performed a systematic review of preclinical studies to estimate the treatment efficacy of stem cells in animal models of HD. Based on our systematic review, treatment with stem cells significantly improves neurological and behavioral outcomes in animal models of HD. Although promising results were found, the design of animal studies, the types of transplanted cells and the route of administration are poorly standardized and this greatly complicates comparative analysis.

KEYWORDS:

Huntington's disease; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Mesenchymal stem cells; Neural stem cells; Stem cells; Therapy

PMID:
30685323
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcn.2019.01.006

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center