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Nutr Diabetes. 2019 Jan 9;9(1):1. doi: 10.1038/s41387-018-0069-2.

The effect of different sources of fish and camelina sativa oil on immune cell and adipose tissue mRNA expression in subjects with abnormal fasting glucose metabolism: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. Vanessa.Laaksonen@uef.fi.
2
Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
5
Department of Ophthalmology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
6
Department of Medicine, Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
7
Institute of Biomedicine, Physiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Molecular mechanisms linking fish and vegetable oil intakes to their healthy metabolic effects may involve attenuation of inflammation. Our primary aim was to examine in a randomized controlled setting whether diets enriched in fatty fish (FF), lean fish (LF) or ALA-rich camelina sativa oil (CSO) differ in their effects on the mRNA expression response of selected inflammation-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Samples from 72 participants randomized to one of the following 12-week intervention groups, FF (n = 19), LF (n = 19), CSO (n = 17) or a control group (n = 17), were available for the PBMC study. For SAT, 39 samples (n = 8, n = 10, n = 9, n = 12, respectively) were available. The mRNA expression was measured at baseline and 12 weeks by TaqMan® Low Density Array.

RESULTS:

In PBMCs, LF decreased ICAM1 mRNA expression (P < 0.05), which was different (P = 0.06, Bonferroni correction) from the observed increase in the FF group (P < 0.05). Also, compared to the control group, LF decreased ICAM1 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Moreover, the change in ICAM1 mRNA expression correlated positively with the intake of FF (P < 0.05) and negatively with the intake of LF (P < 0.05), independently of study group. A diet enriched in CSO, a rich source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), decreased PBMC IFNG mRNA expression (P < 0.01). The intake of CSO in the CSO group, but not the increase in plasma ALA proportions, correlated inversely with the IFNG mRNA expression in PBMCs (P = 0.08). In SAT, when compared with the control group, the effect of FF on decreasing IL1RN mRNA expression was significant (P < 0.03).

CONCLUSION:

We propose that CSO intake may partly exert its benefits through immuno-inflammatory molecular regulation in PBMCs, while modulation of ICAM1 expression, an endothelial/vascular-related gene, may be more dependent on the type of fish consumed.

PMID:
30683848
PMCID:
PMC6347599
DOI:
10.1038/s41387-018-0069-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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