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Sci Rep. 2019 Jan 24;9(1):734. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-37042-3.

Dynamics of the gut microbiota in developmental stages of Litopenaeus vannamei reveal its association with body weight.

Author information

1
Institute of Synthetic Biology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, 518000, China.
2
R&D Center, Shenzhen Alpha Group Co., Ltd, Shenzhen, 518000, China.
3
Institute of Synthetic Biology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, 518000, China. yingfei.ma@siat.ac.cn.
4
Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Synthetic Genomics, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, 518055, China. yingfei.ma@siat.ac.cn.

Abstract

Increasing evidences have revealed a close interaction between the intestinal microbes and host growth performance. The shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) gut harbors a diverse microbial community, yet its associations with dietary, body weight and weaning age remain a matter of debate. In this study, we analyzed the effects of different dietary (fishmeal group (NC), krill meal group (KM)) and different growth stages (age from 42 day-old to 98 day-old) of the shrimp on the intestinal microbiota. High throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of shrimp intestinal microbes determined the novelty of bacteria in the shrimp gut microbiota and a core of 58 Operation Taxonomic Units (OTUs) was present among the shrimp gut samples. Analysis results indicated that the development of the shrimp gut microbiota is a dynamic process with three stages across the age according to the gut microbiota compositions. Furthermore, the dietary of KM group did not significantly change the intestinal microbiota of the shrimps compared with NC group. Intriguingly, compared to NC group, we observed in KM group that a fluctuation of the shrimp gut microbiota coincided with the shrimp body weight gain between weeks 6-7. Six OTUs associated with the microbiota change in KM group were identified. This finding strongly suggests that the shrimp gut microbiota may be correlated with the shrimp body weight likely by influencing nutrient uptake in the gut. The results obtained from this study potentially will be guidelines for manipulation to provide novel shrimp feed management approaches.

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