Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Food Nutr Res. 2019;87:147-185. doi: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2018.09.001. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Microbial Ecology of Fermented Vegetables and Non-Alcoholic Drinks and Current Knowledge on Their Impact on Human Health.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Center for Human Nutrition, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, United States; Direction des Etudes Et Prestations (DEEP), Institut Polytechnique UniLaSalle, Beauvais, France.
2
Department of Food Science and Center for Human Nutrition, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, United States.
3
Department of Food Science and Center for Human Nutrition, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, United States. Electronic address: fgcarbon@uark.edu.

Abstract

Fermented foods are currently experiencing a re-discovery, largely driven by numerous health benefits claims. While fermented dairy, beer, and wine (and other alcoholic fermented beverages) have been the subject of intensive research, other plant-based fermented foods that are in some case widely consumed (kimchi/sauerkraut, pickles, kombucha) have received less scientific attention. In this chapter, the current knowledge on the microbiology and potential health benefits of such plant-based fermented foods are presented. Kimchi is the most studied, characterized by primarily acidic fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Anti-obesity and anti-hypertension properties have been reported for kimchi and other pickled vegetables. Kombucha is the most popular non-alcoholic fermented drink. Kombucha's microbiology is remarkable as it involves all fermenters described in known fermented foods: lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, fungi, and yeasts. While kombucha is often hyped as a "super-food," only antioxidant and antimicrobial properties toward foodborne pathogens are well established; and it is unknown if these properties incur beneficial impact, even in vitro or in animal models. The mode of action that has been studied and demonstrated the most is the probiotic one. However, it can be expected that fermentation metabolites may be prebiotic, or influence host health directly. To conclude, plant-based fermented foods and drinks are usually safe products; few negative reports can be found, but more research, especially human dietary intervention studies, are warranted to substantiate any health claim.

KEYWORDS:

Fermented vegetables; Gut microbiota; Kimchi; Kombucha; Microbial successions

PMID:
30678814
DOI:
10.1016/bs.afnr.2018.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center