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Nutrients. 2019 Jan 24;11(2). pii: E255. doi: 10.3390/nu11020255.

Effects of Caffeine Supplementation on Power Performance in a Flywheel Device: A Randomised, Double-Blind Cross-Over Study.

Author information

1
Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Isabel I, 09001 Burgos, Spain. daniel.castillo@ui1.es.
2
Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Isabel I, 09001 Burgos, Spain. raul.dominguez@ui1.es.
3
Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Isabel I, 09001 Burgos, Spain. alejandro.rodriguez.fernandez@ui1.es.
4
Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Isabel I, 09001 Burgos, Spain. javier.raya@ui1.es.

Abstract

Despite the demonstrated evidence of the importance of eccentric contractions in sports performance, no research has evaluated the ergogenic effects of caffeine on this type of contraction means during flywheel exercises. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to compare the power outcomes, using different inertial loads, between caffeine and placebo conditions. Twenty-four young, healthy, and active men (age: 22.5 ± 4.8 years) took part in the study. A crossed, randomised double-blind design was used to analyse the effects of caffeine on lower limb power outcomes during a flywheel half-squat exercise. Participants completed four sets of eight all-out repetitions with a fixed three-minutes rest interval, and each set was performed using different inertial loads (i.e., 0.025, 0.050, 0.075 and 0.100 kg·m-2). Both the mean power (MP) and peak power (PP) in concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) movement phases at each inertial load were recorded after participants were administered either a caffeine supplement (6 mg·kg-1) or placebo (sucrose). Participants receiving a caffeine supplementation demonstrated improvements versus the placebo in total MP (MPtotal), as well as MP in CON phase (MPcon) and in ECC phase (MPecc) at each inertial load (22.68 to 26.53%; p < 0.01, effect size (ES) = 0.89⁻1.40). In addition, greater improvements with caffeine ingestion were obtained with respect to the placebo condition (18.79 to 24.98%; p < 0.01, ES = 1.03⁻1.40) in total PP (PPtotal), as well as PP in CON phase (PPcon) and in ECC phase (PPecc) at each inertial load. Thus, the supplementation of 6 mg·kg-1 caffeine may be considered to maximise on-field physical performance in those sports characterised by high demands of resistance.

KEYWORDS:

coffee; ergogenic aid; exercise; resistance exercise; resistance training; sport; squat; strength; supplement

PMID:
30678333
PMCID:
PMC6412282
DOI:
10.3390/nu11020255
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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