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Acad Pediatr. 2019 Jan 21. pii: S1876-2859(19)30007-5. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2019.01.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Parental and Provider Perceptions of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Interventions in the First 1000Days: A Qualitative Study.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics (K Morel, K Nichols, Y Nong, and JA Woo Baidal); Institute of Human Nutrition (K Morel and Y Nong), Columbia University Medical Center.
2
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics (K Morel, K Nichols, Y Nong, and JA Woo Baidal).
3
New York Presbyterian Hospital Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (N Charles), New York, NY.
4
Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, MassGeneral Hospital for Children (S Price and E Taveras), Boston, Mass.
5
Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University (R Goldman), Pawtucket, RI.
6
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics (K Morel, K Nichols, Y Nong, and JA Woo Baidal). Electronic address: jw3286@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Novel approaches to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption during the first 1000 days-pregnancy through age 2 years-are urgently needed.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine perceptions of SSB consumption and acceptability of potential intervention strategies to promote SSB avoidance in low-income families in the first 1000days.

METHODS:

In this qualitative research, we performed semistructured, in-depth interviews of 25 women and 7nutrition/health care providers. Eligible women were Women, Infants, and Children program-enrolled and pregnant or had an infant younger than age 2years. Eligible providers cared for families during the first 1000days. Using immersion-crystallization techniques, we examined perceptions, barriers, and facilitators related to avoidance of SSB consumption; acceptability of messages framed as positive gains or negative losses; and perceived influence on SSB consumption of various intervention modalities.

RESULTS:

Themes related to SSB consumption included parental confusion about healthy beverage recommendations and maternal feelings of lack of control over beverage choices due to pregnancy cravings and infant tastes. Themes surrounding message frames included negative health consequences of sugary drink consumption are strong motivators for behavior change; and savings and cost count, but are not top priority. Highly acceptable intervention strategies included use of images showing health consequences of SSB consumption, illustrations of sugar content at the point of purchase, and multimodal delivery of messages.

CONCLUSIONS:

Messages focused on infant health consequences and parental empowerment to evaluate and select healthier beverages based on sugar content should be tested in interventions to reduce SSB consumption in the first 1000days.

KEYWORDS:

infants; low-income; nutrition; obesity; sugar sweetened beverages

PMID:
30677540
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2019.01.004

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