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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Feb;27(2):325-331. doi: 10.1002/oby.22374.

Rapid Assessment of Reward-Related Eating: The RED-X5.

Author information

1
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
2
Institute of Psychology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Center for Health and Community, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The prevalence of obesity has created a plethora of questionnaires characterizing psychological aspects of eating behavior, such as reward-related eating (RRE). The Reward-based Eating Drive questionnaires (RED-9, RED-13) broadly and deeply assess the RRE construct. However, large-sample research designs require shorter questionnaires that capture RRE quickly and precisely. This study sought to develop a brief, reliable, and valid version of the RED questionnaire.

METHODS:

All-subset correlation was used to find a subset that maximally associated with the full RED-13 in two separate samples. Results were validated in a third independent sample. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and ability to explain variance in external outcomes were also assessed.

RESULTS:

A five-item questionnaire (RED-X5) correlated strongly with RED-13 in the independent sample (r = 0.95). RED-X5 demonstrated high internal consistency (omega total ≥ 0.80) and 6-month test-retest reliability (r = 0.72). RED-X5 accurately reproduced known associations between RED-13 and BMI, diabetes status, and craving for sweet and savory foods. As a novel finding, RED questionnaires predicted laboratory intake of chips.

CONCLUSIONS:

RED-X5 is a short, reliable, and valid measure of the RRE construct and can be readily implemented in large-sample research designs in which questionnaire space is limited.

PMID:
30677261
PMCID:
PMC6352904
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22374

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