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J Athl Train. 2019 Jan;54(1):99-105. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-82-18. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Emergency Action Planning in Secondary School Athletics: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Current Adoption of Best Practice Standards.

Author information

1
Korey Stringer Institute, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
2
Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
3
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Emergency action plans (EAPs) are policies that improve response times and ensure access to emergency equipment for the management of patients with acute injuries and medical conditions, yet the extent to which EAP standards are adopted and implemented is unknown.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the extent of EAP adoption and implementation in secondary school (SS) athletics with athletic trainer (AT) services in the United States.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Web-based questionnaire.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

A national sample of ATs (n = 9642) was invited to participate in a Web-based questionnaire.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Twelve components of EAP minimum best practices were derived from the "National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Position Statement: Emergency Planning in Athletics." Emergency action plan components were analyzed using descriptive statistics with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) around proportions. Contingency tables (2 × 2) were used to calculate odds ratios (with 95% CIs) to assess adoption of the components (dichotomized as yes or no), employment factors (eg, full time versus part time, employed by clinic/district), and access to emergency equipment.

RESULTS:

The response rate for the questionnaire was 13.2% (n = 1273). A majority of ATs (89.1%) reported having an EAP; however, only 9.9% described implementing all 12 components cited in the NATA position statement. Athletic trainers stated that they created the EAP in 62.8% (95% CI = 60.1%, 65.4%) of schools with an EAP. Athletic trainers employed full time were at greater odds of adopting 9 or more components of the EAP compared with ATs employed part time (odds ratio = 2.42 [95% CI = 1.66, 3.53]). A total of 85.7% of ATs noted access to an automated external defibrillator.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although a majority of SSs had EAPs, the EAPs were often incomplete and lacked the necessary components for full compliance with the NATA position statement. These findings demonstrate the need for efforts to promote the adoption and implementation of comprehensive EAPs in SS athletics.

KEYWORDS:

catastrophic injury; death; policies; preparedness

PMID:
30676786
PMCID:
PMC6410982
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-82-18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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