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Gels. 2018 Mar 26;4(2). pii: E28. doi: 10.3390/gels4020028.

Temperature-Responsive Hydrogel-Coated Gold Nanoshells.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry and the Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003, USA. hhpark95@gmail.com.
2
Department of Chemistry and the Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003, USA. slaongnuan@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Chemistry and the Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003, USA. andrewcjamison@yahoo.com.
4
Department of Chemistry and the Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003, USA. sdzbltt@gmail.com.
5
Department of Chemistry and the Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003, USA. mdmarqu2@gmail.com.
6
School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Korea. heyshoo@cau.ac.kr.
7
Departments of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 123 Chemdan-gwagiro (Oryong-dong), Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea. jaylinlee@gist.ac.kr.
8
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli City 32001, Taiwan. taichoulee@ncu.edu.tw.
9
Department of Chemistry and the Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003, USA. trlee@uh.edu.

Abstract

Gold nanoshells (~160 nm in diameter) were encapsulated within a shell of temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(NIPAM-co-AA)) using a surface-bound rationally-designed free radical initiator in water for the development of a photothermally-induced drug-delivery system. The morphologies of the resultant hydrogel-coated nanoshells were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the temperature-responsive behavior of the nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The diameter of the P(NIPAM-co-AA) encapsulated nanoshells decreased as the solution temperature was increased, indicating a collapse of the hydrogel layer with increasing temperatures. In addition, the optical properties of the composite nanoshells were studied by UV-visible spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of the hydrogel-coated nanoshells appeared at ~800 nm, which lies within the tissue-transparent range that is important for biomedical applications. Furthermore, the periphery of the particles was conjugated with the model protein avidin to modify the hydrogel-coated nanoshells with a fluorescent-tagged biotin, biotin-4-fluorescein (biotin-4-FITC), for colorimetric imaging/monitoring.

KEYWORDS:

drug delivery; gold nanoshell; hydrogel coating; temperature responsive

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