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BMJ. 2019 Jan 23;364:k5420. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k5420.

Association of fried food consumption with all cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality: prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
3
Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA wei-bao@uiowa.edu.
5
Obesity Research and Education Initiative, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
6
Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the prospective association of total and individual fried food consumption with all cause and cause specific mortality in women in the United States.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Women's Health Initiative conducted in 40 clinical centers in the US.

PARTICIPANTS:

106 966 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 at study entry who were enrolled between September 1993 and 1998 in the Women's Health Initiative and followed until February 2017.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

All cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and cancer mortality.

RESULTS:

31 558 deaths occurred during 1 914 691 person years of follow-up. For total fried food consumption, when comparing at least one serving per day with no consumption, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio was 1.08 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.16) for all cause mortality and 1.08 (0.96 to 1.22) for cardiovascular mortality. When comparing at least one serving per week of fried chicken with no consumption, the hazard ratio was 1.13 (1.07 to 1.19) for all cause mortality and 1.12 (1.02 to 1.23) for cardiovascular mortality. For fried fish/shellfish, the corresponding hazard ratios were 1.07 (1.03 to 1.12) for all cause mortality and 1.13 (1.04 to 1.22) for cardiovascular mortality. Total or individual fried food consumption was not generally associated with cancer mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Frequent consumption of fried foods, especially fried chicken and fried fish/shellfish, was associated with a higher risk of all cause and cardiovascular mortality in women in the US.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf and declare: no financial relationships with any organisations that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years; no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

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