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Plant Dis. 2018 Mar;102(3):500-506. doi: 10.1094/PDIS-07-17-1032-RE. Epub 2018 Jan 2.

Shoot Blight on Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) is Caused by Bipolaris oryzae.

Author information

1
College of Forestry and Co-Innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210037, China.
2
The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Valley Laboratory, Windsor 06095; and Co-Innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, Nanjing Forestry University.
3
Yangkou State Forest Farm, Nanping, Fujian 353211, China.
4
College of Forestry and Co-Innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, Nanjing Forestry University.

Abstract

Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) is a significant timber species that has been broadly cultivated in southern China. A shoot blight disease on Chinese fir seedlings was discovered in Fujian, China and a fungus was then consistently associated with the symptoms. This fungus was determined to be causing this disease, among others by fulfilling Koch's postulates. Based on morphological characteristics and multilocus phylogenetic analyses with the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer, partial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, partial translation elongation factor 1-α gene, and partial 28S large subunit ribosomal RNA gene, the fungus was identified as Bipolaris oryzae. These characteristics and phylogenetic analyses clearly support that this pathogen is different from B. sacchari, which was, until now, considered to be the causal agent of a similar blight on Chinese fir in Guangdong, China. The fungus was also shown to be strongly pathogenic to rice, one of the most susceptible hosts to B. oryzae. Crop rotation involving rice is often carried out with Chinese fir in southern China, a practice that most likely increases the risk of shoot blight on C. lanceolata. To our knowledge, shoot blight caused by B. oryzae is reported for the first time in a gymnosperm species.

PMID:
30673483
DOI:
10.1094/PDIS-07-17-1032-RE
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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