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Clin Rheumatol. 2019 Apr;38(4):1213-1216. doi: 10.1007/s10067-019-04434-3. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Gout and healthcare utilization and complications after hip arthroplasty: a cohort study using the US National Inpatient Sample (NIS).

Author information

1
Medicine Service, VA Medical Center, 700 19th St S, Birmingham, AL, 35233, USA. Jasvinder.md@gmail.com.
2
Department of Medicine at School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 Second Ave. South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0022, USA. Jasvinder.md@gmail.com.
3
Division of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 Second Ave. South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0022, USA. Jasvinder.md@gmail.com.
4
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Faculty Office Tower 805B, 510 20th Street S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0022, USA. Jasvinder.md@gmail.com.
5
Department of Medicine at School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 Second Ave. South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0022, USA.
6
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Faculty Office Tower 805B, 510 20th Street S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0022, USA.

Abstract

Little is known about the effect of gout on in-hospital complications and healthcare utilization after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We used the 1998-2014 U.S. National Inpatient Sample (NIS) to examine this question using cohort study design. Multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analyses included age, race, gender, underlying diagnosis, Deyo-Romano comorbidity index, insurance payer, and income. In adjusted analyses, we found that gout was associated with 9-20% higher healthcare utilization and 6% higher hazard of transfusion after primary THA. These findings can inform surgeons and patients of gout-associated complications post-THA.

KEYWORDS:

Gout; Healthcare utilization; Hip arthroplasty

PMID:
30671748
DOI:
10.1007/s10067-019-04434-3

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