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Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:125-131. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2018.09.019. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Feasibility of yoga as a complementary therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes: The Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C) study.

Author information

1
Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, 164 Summit Avenue, Providence, RI, 02906, United States. Electronic address: Beth_Bock@Brown.edu.
2
Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, 164 Summit Avenue, Providence, RI, 02906, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study:Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C), examined the feasibility and acceptability of yoga as a complementary therapy for adults with Type-2 Diabetes (T2DM).

DESIGN:

A 2-arm randomized clinical trial comparing Iyengar yoga with a supervised walking program.

SETTING:

Hospital based gym-type facility and conference rooms.

INTERVENTIONS:

Participants were randomized to a 12-week program of either; (1) a twice weekly Iyengar yoga, or (2) a twice-weekly program of standard exercise (SE).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Primary outcomes assessed feasibility and acceptability, including enrollment rates, attendance, study completion, and participant satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included HbA1c, physical activity, and measures of diabetes-related emotional distress, self-care and quality of life (QOL). Assessments were conducted at baseline, end of treatment, 6-months and 9-months post-enrollment.

RESULTS:

Of 175 adults screened for eligibility, 48 (30 women, 18 men) were eligible and enrolled. The most common reasons for ineligibility were orthopedic restrictions, HbA1c levels <6.5 and BMI > 42. Session attendance was high (82% of sessions attended), as was follow-up completion rates (92%). Program satisfaction rated on a 5-point scale, was high among both Yoga (M = 4.63, SD = 0.57) and SE (M = 4.77, SD = 0.52) participants. Overall 44 adverse events (26 Yoga, 18 SE) were reported. Of these, six were deemed "possibly related" (e.g., neck strain, back pain), and 1 "probably related" (ankle pain after treadmill) to the study. Yoga produced significant reductions in HbA1c. Median HbA1c at 6 months was 1.25 units lower for Yoga compared to SE (95% CI: -2.54 -0.04). Greater improvements in diabetes self-care, quality of life, and emotional distress were seen among Yoga participants than among SE participants. Increases in mindfulness were seen in Yoga but not in SE.

CONCLUSIONS:

The yoga intervention was highly feasible and acceptable, and produced improvements in blood glucose and psychosocial measures of diabetes management.

KEYWORDS:

Complementary therapy; Diabetes; Exercise; Feasibility; Physical activity; Type 2 diabetes; Yoga

PMID:
30670230
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2018.09.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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