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Iran J Med Sci. 2019 Jan;44(1):1-9.

The Effect of Aloe Vera Clinical Trials on Prevention and Healing of Skin Wound: A Systematic Review.

Author information

1
Department of Nursing, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran.
2
Student of Nursing, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran.
3
Department of Clinical Pharmacology; Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran.

Abstract

Background:

Aloe vera is an herbaceous and perennial plant that belongs to the Liliaceae family and used for many medicinal purposes. The present study aimed to systematically review clinical trials regarding the effect of Aloe vera on the prevention and healing of skin wounds.

Methods:

To identify all related published studies, we searched SID, IRANDOC, Google Scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ScienceDirect databases in both the English and Persian languages from 1990 to 2016. The keywords used were Aloe vera, wound healing, and prevention. All clinical trials using Aloe vera gel, cream, or derivatives that included a control group with placebo or comparison with other treatments were included in the study. The PRISMA checklist (2009) was used to conduct the review.

Results:

In total, 23 trials that met the inclusion criteria were studied. The results of the studies showed that Aloe vera has been used to prevent skin ulcers and to treat burn wounds, postoperative wounds, cracked nipples, genital herpes, psoriasis, and chronic wounds including pressure ulcers.

Conclusion:

Considering the properties of Aloe vera and its compounds, it can be used to retain skin moisture and integrity and to prevent ulcers. It seems that the application of Aloe vera, as a complementary treatment along with current methods, can improve wound healing and promote the health of society.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trial ; Prevention ; Systematic review; Wound healing ; Wounds and injuries ; Aloe

PMID:
30666070
PMCID:
PMC6330525

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