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Respir Med. 2019 Jan;146:116-123. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2018.11.017. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels. A population based international study.

Author information

1
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Spain.
2
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain.
3
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
4
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Population Health and Occupational Diseases, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology I, Neuherberg, Germany; Institute and Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Comprehensive Pneumology Centre Munich, German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Germany; Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Department of Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
7
Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
8
University of Antwerp, Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine (ESOC), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stat UA Statistics Centre, Belgium.
9
Institute and Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Comprehensive Pneumology Centre Munich, German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Germany.
10
Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete, Servicio de Neumología, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Facultad de Medicina, Albacete, Spain.
11
Department of Pneumology, Hospital San Agustin, Aviles, Asturias, Spain.
12
Department of Nursing, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
13
Université de Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, Team EPICENE, UMR 1219, Bordeaux, France.
14
CHU de Grenoble Alpes, Department of Pédiatrie, Inserm, U1209, IAB, Team of Environmental Epidemiology Applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Grenoble, France.
15
University Hospital of Montpellier, Sorbonne Universités, Montpellier, France.
16
Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
17
Unit of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
18
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
19
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Goteburg, Sweden.
20
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
21
Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
22
Lung Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
23
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
24
Inserm, UMR 1152, Pathophysiology and Epidemiology of Respiratory Diseases, Paris, France; University Paris Diderot Paris, UMR 1152, Paris, France.
25
Respiratory Department, Galdakao Hospital, OSI Barrualde-Galdakao, Biscay, Spain.
26
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.
27
Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
28
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: judith.garcia@isglobal.org.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Restrictive spirometry pattern is an under-recognised disorder with a poor morbidity and mortality prognosis. We compared physical activity levels between adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern and with normal spirometry.

METHODS:

Restrictive spirometry pattern was defined as a having post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ≥ Lower Limit of Normal and a FVC<80% predicted in two population-based studies (ECRHS-III and SAPALDIA3). Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The odds of having low physical activity (<1st study-specific tertile) was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern (n = 280/4721 in ECRHS, n = 143/3570 in SAPALDIA) reported lower levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry (median of 1770 vs 2253 MET·min/week in ECRHS, and 3519 vs 3945 MET·min/week in SAPALDIA). Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low physical activity (meta-analysis odds ratio: 1.41 [95%CI 1.07-1.86]) than those with a normal spirometry. Obesity, respiratory symptoms, co-morbidities and previous physical activity levels did not fully explain this finding.

CONCLUSION:

Adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry. These results highlight the need to identify and act on this understudied but prevalent condition.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Epidemiology; Lung function; Physical activity; Restrictive spirometry pattern

PMID:
30665509
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2018.11.017

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