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Environ Res. 2019 Apr;171:161-169. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2019.01.017. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Identification of metabolic pathways related to the bisphenol A-induced adipogenesis in differentiated murine adipocytes by using RNA-sequencing.

Author information

1
National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Osong 28159, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10326, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: ypark@dongguk.edu.

Abstract

We evaluated the effect of bisphenol A and its metabolites on the 3T3-L1 cells, in terms of glucose and lipid metabolism. We also aimed to obtain the information on the genome-wide expression changes in the 3T3-L1 cells treated with Bisphenol A by using RNA-seq, which involves whole-transcriptome sequencing. Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) collected from RNA-seq can be used to produce a complete picture of related metabolism pathways. The KEGG pathway was extracted based on the DEGs. Bisphenol A significantly increased the mRNA level of Sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (Srebf1) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (Cebpa). Lipoprotein lipase (Lpl) was also significantly influenced by bisphenol A and its metabolites. Acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase beta (Acacb) and Fatty acid synthase (Fasn) mRNA levels were elevated by bisphenol A and its metabolites. The insulin signaling pathway, neurotrophin signaling pathway, and endometrial cancer-related pathway were focused by the functional enrichment analyses, and the pathways were well coincided with recent previous reports. DEGs collected from RNA-seq were confirmed as a reliable evidence in the exposure to the chemicals such as bisphenol A. Collecting pieces of the puzzles obtained from the RNA-seq will help us to produce a complete picture of the metabolic pathway for such chemicals.

KEYWORDS:

3T3-L1; Bisphenol A; Human liver S9 fraction; KEGG PATHWAY; RNA-seq; Transcriptome

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