Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Psychophysiol. 2019 Mar;137:41-53. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2019.01.003. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Exploring brain functions in autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review on functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Fen.Zhang@Ugent.be.
2
Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.

Abstract

A growing body of research has investigated the functional development of the brain in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is increasingly being used in this respect. This method has several advantages over other functional neuroimaging techniques in studying brain functions in ASD, including portability, low cost, and availability in naturalistic settings. This article reviews thirty empirical studies, published in the past decade, that used fNIRS in individuals with ASD or in infants with a high risk of developing ASD. These studies investigated either brain activation using multiple tasks (e.g., face processing, joint attention and working memory) or functional organization under a resting-state condition in ASD. The majority of these studies reported atypical brain activation in the prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, middle and superior temporal gyrus. Some studies revealed altered functional connectivity, suggesting an inefficient information transfer between brain regions in ASD. Overall, the findings suggest that fNIRS is a promising tool to explore neurodevelopment in ASD from an early age.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; Brain development; Functional near-infrared spectroscopy; Neurodevelopmental disorders; fNIRS

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center