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Nat Rev Cardiol. 2019 Jun;16(6):344-360. doi: 10.1038/s41569-018-0145-2.

Transient receptor potential channels in cardiac health and disease.

Author information

1
IHU-Liryc, Electrophysiology and Heart Modeling Institute, Foundation Bordeaux Université, Pessac-Bordeaux, France.
2
INSERM, Centre de recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, U1045, Bordeaux, France.
3
Université Bordeaux, Centre de recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, U1045, Bordeaux, France.
4
Normandie Université, UNICAEN, EA4650, Signalisation, Électrophysiologie et Imagerie des Lésions d'Ischémie-Reperfusion Myocardique, Caen, France.
5
Normandie Université, UNICAEN, EA4650, Signalisation, Électrophysiologie et Imagerie des Lésions d'Ischémie-Reperfusion Myocardique, Caen, France. romain.guinamard@unicaen.fr.

Abstract

Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are nonselective cationic channels that are generally Ca2+ permeable and have a heterogeneous expression in the heart. In the myocardium, TRP channels participate in several physiological functions, such as modulation of action potential waveform, pacemaking, conduction, inotropy, lusitropy, Ca2+ and Mg2+ handling, store-operated Ca2+ entry, embryonic development, mitochondrial function and adaptive remodelling. Moreover, TRP channels are also involved in various pathological mechanisms, such as arrhythmias, ischaemia-reperfusion injuries, Ca2+-handling defects, fibrosis, maladaptive remodelling, inherited cardiopathies and cell death. In this Review, we present the current knowledge of the roles of TRP channels in different cardiac regions (sinus node, atria, ventricles and Purkinje fibres) and cells types (cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts) and discuss their contribution to pathophysiological mechanisms, which will help to identify the best candidates for new therapeutic targets among the cardiac TRP family.

PMID:
30664669
DOI:
10.1038/s41569-018-0145-2

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