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J Exerc Sci Fit. 2019 Jan;17(1):20-25. doi: 10.1016/j.jesf.2018.10.001. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Results from the Japan's 2018 report card on physical activity for children and youth.

Author information

1
Division of Integrated Sciences, J. F. Oberlin University, 3758 Tokiwamachi, Machida, Tokyo, 194-0294, Japan.
2
Dept of Nutrition and Metabolism, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, 162-8636, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Dept of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8402, Japan.
4
Dept of Physical Activity Research, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, 162-8636, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Sports Science, Juntendo University 1-1 Hiraka-gakuendai, Inzai-city, Chiba, 270-1695, Japan.
6
Center for Community-Based Healthcare Research and Education (CoHRE), Shimane University, Shimane, Japan.
7
Physical Activity for Health Group, School of Psychological, Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde, Graham Hills Building (Room 531) 50 George Street Glasgow, G1 1QE, UK.

Abstract

Background:

The momentum to promote physical activity (PA) by various government agencies such as the Japan Sports Agency established in 2015, academic organizations, and companies is increasing towards the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. The goal of the 2018 Japan Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth is to assess and track levels of health behaviors related to PA in Japanese children and youth, facilitators and barriers for PA, and related health outcomes.

Methods:

Nationally representative data were used to score the indicators.

Results:

The 2018 Japan Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth consists of health behaviors and outcomes (7 indicators), and influences on health behaviors (4 indicators). The key four health behaviors and outcomes (Organized Sport Participation: B-; Active Transportation: A-; Physical fitness: A, Weight status: A) were favorable. Sedentary Behavior received C- grade, while 2 indicators (Overall Physical Activity, and Active Play) could not be graded. In the Influences domain, Family Influence and Community were graded as C-, while School (B+), Community and Environment (B-), and Government Strategies and Investments (B) were favorable.

Conclusions:

The 2018 Japan Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth shows that Japanese children and youth have favorable levels of organized sport participation, active transportation to and from school, and physical fitness and weight status. Future nationally representative surveys on overall PA and active play are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Environment; HBSC, The WHO Health Behavior in School-aged Children; JSA, Japan Sports Agency; MEXT, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology; PA, physical activity; PE, physical education; Physical fitness; Policy; RWG, research work group; Report Card, Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth; Sedentary behavior; Sports

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