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J Neurotrauma. 2019 Jan 19. doi: 10.1089/neu.2018.6127. [Epub ahead of print]

A systematic review of closed head injury models of mild traumatic brain injury in mice and rats.

Author information

1
University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Spinal Cord & Brain Injury Research Center, Lexington, Kentucky, United States ; colleen.bodnar@uky.edu.
2
University of Kentucky, Spinal Cord & Brain Injury Research Center, Lexington, Kentucky, United States ; knrobe2@uky.edu.
3
University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Spinal Cord & Brain Injury Research Center, Lexington, Kentucky, United States ; emma.higgins@uky.edu.
4
University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Spinal Cord & Brain Injury Research Center , 741 S. Limestone St. , BBSBR B459 , Lexington, Kentucky, United States , 40536 ; adam.bachstetter@uky.edu.

Abstract

Mild TBI (mTBI) is rapidly becoming a major health concern. Researchers use animal models in order to understand the mechanisms and pathological outcomes of mTBI. There are a variety of different closed head models used within the mTBI field that each reproduce one of the characteristics of mTBI (i.e. biomechanics). The purpose of the current review was to compile a comprehensive list of the closed head mTBI rodent models along with the common data elements and outcomes to summarize the current state of the field. Publications were identified from a search of PubMed and Web of Science and screened for eligibility following PRISMA guidelines. Papers were included that were closed head injuries in which the author's classified the injury as 'mild' in rats or mice. Injury model and animal specific common data elements as well as behavioral and histological outcomes were collected from each of the 402 articles included and compiled using GoogleForms. We found that weight drop and piston driven injury models comprised the bulk of mTBI rodent models. 'Other' models were published often in the years before the weight drop or the piston driven models were available commercially. We discovered that females are still underrepresented in the mTBI field along with both young and aged animal studies. Future work should take the outcome measures collected in this review and determine time course of effects and effects of various treatments used following mTBI. With all these publications compiled, we believe this review can be used as a starting place for determining what has been done and what is yet needed.

KEYWORDS:

ANIMAL STUDIES; IN VIVO STUDIES; TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

PMID:
30661454
DOI:
10.1089/neu.2018.6127

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