Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hear Res. 2019 Mar 1;373:103-112. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.004. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Effect of competing noise on cortical auditory evoked potentials elicited by speech sounds in 7- to 25-year-old listeners.

Author information

1
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address: gustafs@med.unc.edu.
2
Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, USA.
3
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.
4
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA; Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Abstract

Child listeners have particular difficulty with speech perception when competing speech noise is present; this challenge is often attributed to their immature top-down processing abilities. The purpose of this study was to determine if the effects of competing speech noise on speech-sound processing vary with age. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) were measured during an active speech-syllable discrimination task in 58 normal-hearing participants (age 7-25 years). Speech syllables were presented in quiet and embedded in competing speech noise (4-talker babble, +15 dB signal-to-noise ratio; SNR). While noise was expected to similarly reduce amplitude and delay latencies of N1 and P2 peaks in all listeners, it was hypothesized that effects of noise on the P3b peak would be inversely related to age due to the maturation of top-down processing abilities throughout childhood. Consistent with previous work, results showed that a +15 dB SNR reduces amplitudes and delays latencies of CAEPs for listeners of all ages, affecting speech-sound processing, delaying stimulus evaluation, and causing a reduction in behavioral speech-sound discrimination. Contrary to expectations, findings suggest that competing speech noise at a +15 dB SNR may have similar effects on various stages of speech-sound processing for listeners of all ages. Future research directions should examine how more difficult listening conditions (poorer SNRs) might affect results across ages.

PMID:
30660965
PMCID:
PMC6359968
[Available on 2020-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.004

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center