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Hautarzt. 2019 Jan 18. doi: 10.1007/s00105-018-4319-y. [Epub ahead of print]

Skin damage by tropospheric ozone.

Author information

1
IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Düsseldorf, Germany.
2
Plant for Human Health Institute, NC Research Campus, North Carolina State University, 600 Laureate Way, 28081, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
3
Plant for Human Health Institute, NC Research Campus, North Carolina State University, 600 Laureate Way, 28081, Kannapolis, NC, USA. gvalacc@ncsu.edu.
4
Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. gvalacc@ncsu.edu.

Abstract

Tropospheric (ground level) ozone (O3) is a secondary pollutant, emerging from other pollutants in the sunshine. Exposure to O3 correlates with higher pulmonary and cardiovascular mortality and affects reproductive health and the central nervous system acutely and chronically. Skin might be a potentially overlooked target organ of ambient O3. The experimental evidence suggests a positive correlation of O3 exposure with oxidative damage, impaired antioxidant defence and proinflammatory response in the skin. In time series studies it was observed that acute rises in O3 levels correlated with seeking medical help for skin conditions; however, whether these findings are specific to O3, is not yet clear. There is preliminary epidemiological evidence that long-term exposure to O3 is associated with premature skin aging. This finding was independent of co-exposure to other environmental factors affecting skin (e.g. ultraviolet radiation and air pollution). As concentrations of O3 are rising in many regions of the world, adverse cutaneous effects of O3 present a relevant public health concern.

KEYWORDS:

Air pollution; Oxidative stress; Peroxidation; Skin aging; Skin wrinkling

PMID:
30659334
DOI:
10.1007/s00105-018-4319-y

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