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Cancers (Basel). 2019 Jan 17;11(1). pii: E106. doi: 10.3390/cancers11010106.

Connexins and Integrins in Exosomes.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu-city, Mie 514-8507, Japan. motomushimaoka@gmail.com.
2
Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu-city, Mie 514-8507, Japan. a_2.uk@mac.com.
3
Department of Disaster and Emergency Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu-city, Mie 514-8507, Japan. a_2.uk@mac.com.
4
Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu-city, Mie 514-8507, Japan. arong-g@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp.
5
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo-city, Shimane 693-8501, Japan. okamoto@med.shimane-u.ac.jp.
6
Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu-city, Mie 514-8507, Japan. epark@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Connexins and integrins, the two structurally and functionally distinct families of transmembrane proteins, have been shown to be inter-connected by various modes of cross-talk in cells, such as direct physical coupling via lateral contact, indirect physical coupling via actin and actin-binding proteins, and functional coupling via signaling cascades. This connexin-integrin cross-talk exemplifies a biologically important collaboration between channels and adhesion receptors in cells. Exosomes are biological lipid-bilayer nanoparticles secreted from virtually all cells via endosomal pathways into the extracellular space, thereby mediating intercellular communications across a broad range of health and diseases, including cancer progression and metastasis, infection and inflammation, and metabolic deregulation. Connexins and integrins are embedded in the exosomal membranes and have emerged as critical regulators of intercellular communication. This concise review article will explain and discuss recent progress in better understanding the roles of connexins, integrins, and their cross-talk in cells and exosomes.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; connexin; crosstalk; exosomes; inflammation; integrin; pannexin

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