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J Exerc Rehabil. 2018 Dec 27;14(6):1085-1091. doi: 10.12965/jer.1836412.206. eCollection 2018 Dec.

Elastic resistance training improved glycemic homeostasis, strength, and functionality in sarcopenic older adults: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Skeletal Muscle Assessment Laboratory, Department of Physical Education, School of Technology and Sciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, Brazil.
2
Exercise and Immunometabolism Research Group, Department of Physical Education, School of Technology and Sciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, Brazil.
3
Immunometabolism of Skeletal Muscle and Exercise Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, Brazil.
4
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Technology and Sciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, Brazil.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of 12 weeks of elastic resistance training on the glucose homeostasis, strength and functionally in sarcopenic older adults. Seven sarcopenic subjects (age, 70.71± 8.0 years; body mass index, 22.75±3.1 kg/m2) participated of training protocol with 12 weeks of elastic resistance training. The oral glucose tolerance test, handgrip strength, sit-to-stand test, 4-m walk test, and coordination test were measured at baseline and after training. According to the results, baseline values of area under the curve of glucose and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance were significantly lower than after 12 weeks, respectively (808.2±185.0 mmol/L vs. 706.6±114.8 mmol/L, P=0.049; 1.44±0.48 vs. 0.73±0.32, P=0.040). There were a significant improve of HGS (24.3±5.7 kg vs. 27.3±7.3 kg, P=0.01), 4-m walking test (3.64±0.4 sec vs. 3.23±0.3 sec, P=0.04), and STS (10.2±2.3 sec vs. 9.0±1.9 sec, P=0.04) compared with baseline. In conclusion, these findings suggest that elastic resistance training improved glucose homeostasis, strength, and functionality in sarcopenic older adults.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Glucose tolerance test; Insulin resistance; Sarcopenia

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICT OF INTEREST No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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