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Nat Commun. 2019 Jan 17;10(1):267. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-08194-7.

Activity in perceptual classification networks as a basis for human subjective time perception.

Author information

1
Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ, UK. wjroseboom@gmail.com.
2
Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ, UK. wjroseboom@gmail.com.
3
Department of Computing, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2RH, UK.
4
DeepMind, London, N1C 4AG, UK.
5
Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ, UK.
6
Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ, UK.
7
Canadian Insitutute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), Azrieli Programme on Brain, Mind, and Consciousness, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Despite being a fundamental dimension of experience, how the human brain generates the perception of time remains unknown. Here, we provide a novel explanation for how human time perception might be accomplished, based on non-temporal perceptual classification processes. To demonstrate this proposal, we build an artificial neural system centred on a feed-forward image classification network, functionally similar to human visual processing. In this system, input videos of natural scenes drive changes in network activation, and accumulation of salient changes in activation are used to estimate duration. Estimates produced by this system match human reports made about the same videos, replicating key qualitative biases, including differentiating between scenes of walking around a busy city or sitting in a cafe or office. Our approach provides a working model of duration perception from stimulus to estimation and presents a new direction for examining the foundations of this central aspect of human experience.

PMID:
30655543
PMCID:
PMC6336826
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-08194-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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