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Trends Biotechnol. 2019 Jul;37(7):730-743. doi: 10.1016/j.tibtech.2018.12.005. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

CRISPR/Cas Systems towards Next-Generation Biosensing.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellence in Nanoscale Biophotonics, Faculty of Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia; Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia; These authors contributed equally to this work.
2
Shanghai Tolo Biotechnology Company Limited, Shanghai 200233, P.R. China; These authors contributed equally to this work.
3
College of Life and Environment Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234, P.R. China. Electronic address: wangjin@shnu.edu.cn.
4
Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellence in Nanoscale Biophotonics, Faculty of Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia; Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia; International Joint Research Center for Intelligent Biosensor Technology and Health, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, P.R. China. Electronic address: guozhen.liu@unsw.edu.au.

Abstract

Beyond its remarkable genome editing ability, the CRISPR/Cas9 effector has also been utilized in biosensing applications. The recent discovery of the collateral RNA cleavage activity of the Cas13a effector has sparked even greater interest in developing novel biosensing technologies for nucleic acid detection and promised significant advances in CRISPR diagnostics. Now, along with the discovery of Cas12 collateral cleavage activities on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), several CRISPR/Cas systems have been established for detecting various targets, including bacteria, viruses, cancer mutations, and others. Based on key Cas effectors, we provide a detailed classification of CRISPR/Cas biosensing systems and propose their future utility. As the field continues to mature, CRISPR/Cas systems have the potential to become promising candidates for next-generation diagnostic biosensing platforms.

KEYWORDS:

CRISPR/Cas; Cas12; Cas13; Cas9; biosensing; diagnostics; nucleic acid detection

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