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Nat Commun. 2019 Jan 16;10(1):261. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-08056-2.

The cell cycle regulator GpsB functions as cytosolic adaptor for multiple cell wall enzymes.

Author information

1
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.
2
FG11 Division of Enteropathogenic Bacteria and Legionella, Robert Koch Institute, Burgstrasse 37, 38855, Wernigerode, Germany.
3
Section of Microbiology and MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2DD, UK.
4
Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari, 09100, Italy.
5
Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, UK.
6
Department of Biology, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA.
7
Department CIBIO, University of Trento, via Sommarive 9, 38123, Povo, Italy.
8
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. r.lewis@ncl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Bacterial growth and cell division requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of the synthesis and remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. GpsB is a cytosolic protein that affects cell wall synthesis by binding cytoplasmic mini-domains of peptidoglycan synthases to ensure their correct subcellular localisation. Here, we describe critical structural features for the interaction of GpsB with peptidoglycan synthases from three bacterial species (Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae) and suggest their importance for cell wall growth and viability in L. monocytogenes and S. pneumoniae. We use these structural motifs to identify novel partners of GpsB in B. subtilis and extend the members of the GpsB interactome in all three bacterial species. Our results support that GpsB functions as an adaptor protein that mediates the interaction between membrane proteins, scaffolding proteins, signalling proteins and enzymes to generate larger protein complexes at specific sites in a bacterial cell cycle-dependent manner.

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