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Rev Clin Esp. 2019 May;219(4):184-188. doi: 10.1016/j.rce.2018.11.004. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Series of 12 cases of wheat-dependent exercise-induced allergy in Aragon, Spain.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Servicio de Alergología, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, España; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, España. Electronic address: aagullog@gmail.com.
2
Servicio de Alergología, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, España; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, España.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

The ω-5 gliadin (ω5G) is considered the main allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). These patients experience anaphylactic reactions after consuming wheat and performing physical exercise. The aim of our study was to describe the main characteristics of 12 patients with this diagnosis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A descriptive, retrospective study was conducted by reviewing the medical records of 12 patients diagnosed with ω-5G hypersensitivity.

RESULTS:

The patients' mean age was 37 years, with 50% men and 50% women. Most of the patients had a history of similar unexamined episodes. The latency period varied from immediate to 150min. The most common symptoms were urticaria (83%), bronchospasms (58%), angio-oedema (42%), hypotension (25%) and gastrointestinal symptoms (16%). The most often involved cofactor was physical exercise. The allergy study was conducted with prick tests and total and specific IgE readings.

CONCLUSIONS:

WDEIA is a relatively rare but potentially severe food allergy. Understanding this allergy is therefore important for a correct diagnosis.

KEYWORDS:

Alergia a trigo; Alergia alimentaria grave; Anafilaxia inducida por ejercicio; Cofactores; Cofactors; Exercise-induced anaphylaxis; Omega-5-gliadin; Omega-5-gliadina; Severe food allergy; Wheat allergy

PMID:
30651196
DOI:
10.1016/j.rce.2018.11.004

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