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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jan 15;16(2). pii: E228. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16020228.

Health Emergency Disaster Risk Management of Public Transport Systems: A Population-Based Study after the 2017 Subway Fire in Hong Kong, China.

Author information

1
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. emily.chan@cuhk.edu.hk.
2
Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK. emily.chan@cuhk.edu.hk.
3
François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health & Human Rights, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02138, USA. emily.chan@cuhk.edu.hk.
4
Accident and Emergency Medicine Academic Unit, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. emily.chan@cuhk.edu.hk.
5
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. huangzhe@cuhk.edu.hk.
6
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. kevin.hung@cuhk.edu.hk.
7
Accident and Emergency Medicine Academic Unit, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. kevin.hung@cuhk.edu.hk.
8
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. gloria.chan@cuhk.edu.hk.
9
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. hollylam@cuhk.edu.hk.
10
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Euglsk@cuhk.edu.hk.
11
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), JC (Jockey Club) School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. may.yeung@cuhk.edu.hk.

Abstract

Background: Literature on health emergency disaster risk management (Health-EDRM) for urban public transport safety is limited. This study explored: (i) the confidence in public transport safety, (ii) the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics and risk perception of transport safety and (iii) the association between previous first-aid training and response knowledge. Method: This is a population-based cross-sectional telephone survey conducted in March 2017, one month after a major subway incident in Hong Kong. Respondents were randomly selected with the Random Digit Dialing method among Cantonese-speaking population ≥15 years. Sociodemographic information, type of transport used and the corresponding worries, response knowledge and previous first-aid training experience (as a proxy for individual skills in Health-EDRM training proxy) were collected. Results: Among the 1000 respondents, 87% used public transport daily. The self-reported confidence in subway safety was 85.6% even after a subway fire accident. Female, those with lower income and people unmarried were more likely to express worry about transport safety. About 46.1⁻63.2% respondents had the correct fire related health response knowledge. Previous first-aid training (32%) was found to be associated with fire response knowledge in a mixed pattern. Conclusions: Despite inadequacy in fire response knowledge, previous first-aid training appeared to be a beneficial factor for emergency response knowledge. Emergency responses education should be provided to the public to reduce health losses during emergencies.

KEYWORDS:

Health-EDRM; emergency response; fire; public transport; risk perception; safety; subway

PMID:
30650569
PMCID:
PMC6351960
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph16020228
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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