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Br J Pharmacol. 1988 Sep;95(1):189-96.

Differential role of extra- and intracellular calcium in the release of EDRF and prostacyclin from cultured endothelial cells.

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1
Department of Applied Physiology, University of Freiburg, F.R.G.

Abstract

1. The effects of extracellular Ca2+ on the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and prostacyclin (PGI2), and on the intracellular free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i), were studied in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. 2. Receptor-mediated stimulation of endothelial cells with bradykinin (10 nM) elicited a transient release of EDRF (assayed by its stimulant effect on purified soluble guanylate cyclase) and of PGI2 (measured by radioimmunoassay for 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha). 3. Bradykinin (10 nM) also increased [Ca2+]i (measured with the fluorescent probe indo-1) from 125 +/- 11 nM to 631 +/- 59 nM, with the same time course as for autacoid release. 4. In Ca2+-free medium, [Ca2+]i was still increased by bradykinin but declined faster (within 1 min) to resting levels than in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. 5. PGI2 release was almost completely abolished in Ca2+-free medium. The intracellular calcium antagonist TMB-8 evoked a similar inhibition of PGI2 release. 6. In contrast, bradykinin-induced EDRF release was not significantly affected by TMB-8 but was completely abolished in Ca2+-free medium. 7. When endothelial cells were stimulated with the receptor-independent drug thimerosal (an inhibitor of the enzyme acyl-CoA-lysolecithin-acyl-transferase; 5 microM), a long-lasting release of EDRF (greater than 90 min) and PGI2 (greater than 20 min) was observed. 8. In contrast to bradykinin stimulation, thimerosal-induced autacoid release was associated with only a slight increase of [Ca2+]i to 201 +/- 13 nM after 40 min. 9. After removal of extracellular Ca2 + from thimerosal-stimulated endothelial cells, [Ca2+] was little affected during the observation time of 90s. EDRF release was completely abolished within 90s whereas PGI2 release was unchanged. 10. We conclude that EDRF production is directly controlled by extracellular Ca2+ during both receptor-dependent and independent stimulation. This effect of extracellular Ca2 + is not mediated by changes in [Ca2+]i. In contrast, PGI2 release is closely correlated to [Ca2+]i in bradykininstimulated endothelial cells. However, the results obtained during thimerosal stimulation indicate that there is not necessarily a tight coupling between the absolute level of [Ca2+]i and the amount of PGI2 released. 9. After removal of extracellular Ca2 + from thimerosal-stimulated endothelial cells, [Ca2+] was little affected during the observation time of 90s. EDRF release was completely abolished within 90s whereas PGI2 release was unchanged. 10. We conclude that EDRF production is directly controlled by extracellular Ca2+ during both receptor-dependent and independent stimulation. This effect of extracellular Ca2 + is not mediated by changes in [Ca2+]i. In contrast, PGI2 release is closely correlated to [Ca2+]i in bradykininstimulated endothelial cells. However, the results obtained during thimerosal stimulation indicate that there is not necessarily a tight coupling between the absolute level of [Ca2+]i and the amount of PGI2 released. 9. After removal of extracellular Ca2 + from thimerosal-stimulated endothelial cells, [Ca2+] was little affected during the observation time of 90s. EDRF release was completely abolished within 90s whereas PGI2 release was unchanged. 10. We conclude that EDRF production is directly controlled by extracellular Ca2+ during both receptor-dependent and independent stimulation. This effect of extracellular Ca2 + is not mediated by changes in [Ca2+]i. In contrast, PGI2 release is closely correlated to [Ca2+]i in bradykininstimulated endothelial cells. However, the results obtained during thimerosal stimulation indicate that there is not necessarily a tight coupling between the absolute level of [Ca2+]i and the amount of PGI2 released.

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