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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2019 Nov;73(11):1480-1491. doi: 10.1038/s41430-018-0383-8. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Design and characterization of dietary assessment in the German National Cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany. sven.knueppel@dife.de.
2
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany.
3
Institute of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Nutritional Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
4
Institute for Prevention and Cancer Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.
6
Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
7
Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), Berlin, Germany.
8
Department for Epidemiology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.
9
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
10
Institute of Statistics, Faculty Mathematics/Computer Science, University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
11
Institute for Biometry and Epidemiology, Leibniz Institute for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
12
Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
13
Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany.
14
Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
15
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
16
Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
17
Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
18
German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Site Greifswald, Germany.
19
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
20
Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumour Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany.
21
German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
22
Department of Nutritional Behaviour, Max Rubner-Institut (MRI), Federal Research Institute of Nutrition and Food, Karlsruhe, Germany.
23
Human Study Center, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany.
24
Clinical Epidemiology, Helmholtz Centre Munich, Neuherberg, Germany.
25
Chair of Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, UNIKA-T, Augsburg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the study was to describe a novel dietary assessment strategy based on two instruments complemented by information from an external population applied to estimate usual food intake in the large-scale multicenter German National Cohort (GNC). As proof of concept, we applied the assessment strategy to data from a pretest study (2012-2013) to assess the feasibility of the novel assessment strategy.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

First, the consumption probability for each individual was modeled using three 24 h food lists (24h-FLs) and frequencies from one food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Second, daily consumed food amounts were estimated from the representative German National Nutrition Survey II (NVS II) taking the characteristics of the participants into account. Usual food intake was estimated using the product of consumption probability and amounts.

RESULTS:

We estimated usual intake of 41 food groups in 318 men and 377 women. The participation proportion was 100, 84.4, and 68.5% for the first, second, and third 24h-FL, respectively. We observed no associations between the probability of participating and lifestyle factors. The estimated distributions of usual food intakes were plausible and total energy was estimated to be 2707 kcal/day for men and 2103 kcal/day for women. The estimated consumption frequencies did not differ substantially between men and women with only few exceptions. The differences in energy intake between men and women were mostly due to differences in estimated daily amounts.

CONCLUSIONS:

The combination of repeated 24h-FLs, a FFQ, and consumption-day amounts from a reference population represents a user-friendly dietary assessment approach having generated plausible, but not yet validated, food intake values in the pretest study.

PMID:
30647440
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-018-0383-8

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