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J Rheumatol. 2019 Jan 15. pii: jrheum.180668. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.180668. [Epub ahead of print]

Comorbidities in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Their Association with Patient-reported Outcomes: Results of Claims Data Linked to Questionnaire Survey.

Author information

1
From the Department for Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg; Epidemiology, German Rheumatism Research Centre, Berlin; Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany. This study was supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (01EC1405). A. Luque Ramos, MPH, Department for Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University; I. Redeker, MSc, Epidemiology, German Rheumatism Research Centre; F. Hoffmann, Professor, Department for Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University; J. Callhoff, MSc, Epidemiology, German Rheumatism Research Centre; A. Zink, Professor, Epidemiology, German Rheumatism Research Centre, and Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité University Medicine Berlin; K. Albrecht, MD, Epidemiology, German Rheumatism Research Centre. Address correspondence to A. Luque Ramos, Department for Health Services Research, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Ammerländer Heerstrasse 140, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany. E-mail: andres.luque.ramos@uni-oldenburg.de. Accepted for publication October 4, 2018.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the prevalence of comorbidities in a population-based cohort of persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to matched controls and to examine their association with patient-reported outcomes in a survey sample.

METHODS:

Data of 96,921 persons with RA [International Classification of Diseases, 10th ed (ICD-10) M05/M06] and 484,605 age- and sex-matched controls without RA of a German statutory health fund were studied regarding 26 selected comorbidities (ICD-10). A self-reported questionnaire, comprising joint counts [(tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC)], functional status (Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire), effect of the disease (Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact of Disease), and well-being (World Health Organization 5-item Well-Being Index; WHO-5) was sent to a random sample of 6193 persons with RA, of whom 3184 responded. For respondents who confirmed their RA (n = 2535), associations between comorbidities and patient-reported outcomes were analyzed by multivariable linear regression.

RESULTS:

Compared to controls, all investigated comorbidities were more frequent in persons with RA (mean age 63 yrs, 80% female). In addition to cardiovascular risk factors, the most common were osteoarthritis (44% vs 21%), depression (32% vs 20%), and osteoporosis (26% vs 9%). Among the survey respondents, 87% of those with 0-1 comorbidity but only 77% of those with ≥ 8 comorbidities were treated by rheumatologists. Increasing numbers of comorbidities were associated with poorer values for TJC, SJC, function, and WHO-5.

CONCLUSION:

Compared to a matched population, persons with RA present with increased prevalence of numerous comorbidities. Patients with RA and multimorbidity are at risk of insufficient rheumatological care and poorer patient-reported outcomes.

PMID:
30647170
DOI:
10.3899/jrheum.180668

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