Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 15;19(1):69. doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-6406-0.

Rotavirus gastroenteritis in Indian children < 5 years hospitalized for diarrhoea, 2012 to 2016.

Author information

1
Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
2
Department of Paediatrics, St. Stephen's Hospital, Tis Hazari, New Delhi, India.
3
Department of Paediatrics, SV Medical College, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
4
Department of Paediatrics, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
5
Department of Paediatrics, Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.
6
Punjagutta, Pragna Hospital, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.
7
Department of Paediatrics, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church Medical College, Kolenchery, Kerala, India.
8
Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
9
Present address: Translational Health Science and Technology Institute (THSTI), Faridabad, India.
10
National Institute of Epidemiology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
11
Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India. gkang@cmcvellore.ac.in.
12
Present address: Translational Health Science and Technology Institute (THSTI), Faridabad, India. gkang@cmcvellore.ac.in.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2016, the Government of India introduced the oral rotavirus vaccine (ROTAVAC, Bharat Biotech, India) in 4 states of India as part of the Universal Immunization Programme, and expanded to 5 more states in 2017. We report four years of data on rotavirus gastroenteritis in hospitalized children < 5 years of age prior to vaccine introduction.

METHODS:

Children from 7 sites in southern and northern India hospitalized for diarrhoea were recruited between July 2012 and June 2016. Stool samples were screened for rotavirus using enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The EIA positive samples were genotyped by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction.

RESULTS:

Of the 5834 samples from the 7 sites, 2069 (35.5%) were positive for rotavirus by EIA. Genotyping was performed for 2010 (97.1%) samples. G1P[8](56.3%), G2P[4](9.1%), G9P[4](7.6%), G9P[8](4.2%), and G12P[6](3.7%) were the common genotypes in southern India and G1P[8](36%), G9P[4](11.4%), G2P[4](11.2%), G12P[6](8.4%), and G3P[8](5.9%) in northern India.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study highlights the high prevalence of rotavirus gastroenteritis in India and the diversity of rotavirus genotypes across different geographical regions. Pre- vaccine surveillance data is necessary to evaluate the potential change in admission rates for gastroenteritis and circulating rotavirus genotypes after vaccine introduction, thus assessing impact.

KEYWORDS:

Diarrhoea; Enzyme immunoassay; Gastroenteritis; Genotypes; India; Polymerase chain reaction; Rotavirus

PMID:
30646867
PMCID:
PMC6334384
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-019-6406-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center