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J Cancer Surviv. 2019 Feb;13(1):117-129. doi: 10.1007/s11764-019-0732-1. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Evaluation of a survivorship needs assessment planning tool for head and neck cancer survivor-caregiver dyads.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences and Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 87 Jonathan Lucas Street MSC 955, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA. sterba@musc.edu.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences and Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 87 Jonathan Lucas Street MSC 955, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.
3
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 87 Jonathan Lucas Street MSC 955, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, MSC 550, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The objectives of this study were to test the acceptability and feasibility of a survivorship needs assessment planning (SNAP) tool for head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors and caregivers, evaluate short-term changes in psychosocial outcomes after completing the SNAP session, and develop strategies for system refinement.

METHODS:

We used a prospective one-group design and mixed methods with HNC survivors and caregivers (N = 25 dyads). Participants completed baseline and 6-week surveys before and after completing a SNAP clinic visit to assess psychosocial outcomes and acceptability. Intervention sessions included tablet-based needs assessments driving tailored care plans. Dyads' open-ended feedback and clinician interviews (N = 12) evaluated acceptability and feasibility.

RESULTS:

SNAP data collection time burden and technology challenges were minimal, and care plans included messages (M = 19), educational materials (M = 13), and referrals (M = 4.5; 86% behavioral medicine, 77% nutrition, 65% physical therapy). Participants reported high satisfaction with the session and care plan, highlighting the key strengths of pulling complex medical information together and the focus on caregiver well-being, with multiple suggestions to facilitate clinic workflow. Depression and unmet needs decreased and survivorship knowledge increased significantly in survivors and caregivers (p < .05) over the 6-week period.

CONCLUSIONS:

The SNAP tool is an innovative technology-based survivor-centered strategy to assess and manage needs in HNC survivors and caregivers. Results support its acceptability and ability to address dyads' needs; the tool merits further testing in a clinical trial.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:

Technology-enabled care planning may be a productive way to assess and address HNC dyads' dynamic needs after treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Dyads; Head and neck cancer; Patient-reported outcomes; Survivorship

PMID:
30645719
PMCID:
PMC6478174
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11764-019-0732-1

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