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Sleep Med Rev. 2019 Apr;44:37-47. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2018.12.005. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Contribution of sleep deprivation to suicidal behaviour: A systematic review.

Author information

1
International School for Postgraduate Studies, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Jimenez Diaz Foundation, Madrid, Spain.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.
3
Neurophysiology Service, University Hospital HLA Moncloa, Madrid, Spain.
4
Department of Psychiatric Emergency and Post-Acute Care, Lapeyronie Hospital, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Jimenez Diaz Foundation, Madrid, Spain; Department of Psychiatry, Madrid Autonomous University, Madrid, Spain.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Jimenez Diaz Foundation, Madrid, Spain; Department of Psychiatry, Madrid Autonomous University, Madrid, Spain; CIBERSAM (Centro de Investigación en Salud Mental), Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain; Universidad Catolica del Maule, Talca, Chile. Electronic address: ebacgar2@yahoo.es.

Abstract

Sleep disturbances and suicidal behaviour are highly prevalent phenomena, representing with a significant burden to society. Sleep has been acknowledged as a potential biomarker for suicidal behaviour. Over the past decade several studies have explored the association between sleep problems and suicidal behaviour. This area has attracted a growing research interest, hence updated information is needed. We therefore present a wide-scope review of the literature summarizing the most relevant studies on epidemiological and theoretical issues underlying this association. Implications of these findings for clinical practice and future research are discussed. We performed a systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases up to October 2018 to identify studies exploring the association between sleep and suicide. Sixty-five articles met the selection criteria, thus they were included in the review. There was a significant and independent association between sleep disturbances and suicide risk. Psychiatric disorders, sleep deprivation-induced neurocognitive deficits, emotional dysregulation, alterations in circadian rhythms, and negative feelings, among other factors, contributed to this relationship. Sleep loss may lead to higher levels of impulsivity, thus increasing unplanned suicidal behaviour. Sleep disturbances may therefore predict suicidal behaviour, hence becoming a potential therapeutic target.

KEYWORDS:

Neurocognition; Sleep disturbances; Suicide; Systematic review

PMID:
30640161
DOI:
10.1016/j.smrv.2018.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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