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Sports Health. 2019 Mar/Apr;11(2):123-133. doi: 10.1177/1941738118819723. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Return to Sport Activity After Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: At What Level and at What Cost? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica II, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.
2
Division of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, California.
3
Applied and Translational Research Center, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.
4
Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
5
Division of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Abstract

CONTEXT::

Meniscal injuries are common among both sport- and non-sport-related injuries, with over 1.7 million meniscal surgeries performed worldwide every year. As meniscal surgeries become more common, so does meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT). However, little is known about the outcomes of MAT in active patients who desire to go back to preinjury activities.

OBJECTIVE::

The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate return to sport, clinical outcome, and complications after MAT in sport-active patients.

DATA SOURCES::

A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL electronic databases was performed on February 25, 2018.

STUDY SELECTION::

Studies of level 1 through 4 evidence looking at MAT in physically active patients with reported return to activity outcomes and at least 2-year follow-up were included.

STUDY DESIGN::

Systematic review and meta-analysis.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE::

Level 4.

DATA EXTRACTION::

Details of sport-related outcomes and reoperations were extracted and pooled in a meta-analysis.

RESULTS::

Nine studies were included in this systematic review. A majority (77%) of athletes and physically active patients were able to return to sport after MAT; two-thirds were able to perform at preinjury levels. Graft-related reoperations were reported in 13% of patients, while the joint replacement rate with partial or total knee prosthesis was 1.2%.

CONCLUSION::

Physical activity after MAT appears possible, especially for low-impact sports. However, because of the limited number of studies, their low quality, and the short-term follow-up, the participation recommendation for high-impact and strenuous activities should be considered with caution until high-quality evidence of long-term safety becomes available.

KEYWORDS:

allograft; meniscal transplant; meniscectomy; postmeniscectomy syndrome; return to play; sport

PMID:
30638438
PMCID:
PMC6391552
[Available on 2020-01-14]
DOI:
10.1177/1941738118819723

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