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J Clin Periodontol. 2019 Feb;46(2):189-196. doi: 10.1111/jcpe.13067. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Association between periodontal disease and preterm prelabour rupture of membranes.

Author information

1
Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine & Perinatal Research, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
5
Domain of Health Data and Digitalization, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
6
Biomedical Research Center, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Periodontal disease is a possible contributing factor to preterm delivery. The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal status of women with preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) and women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Seventy-eight women with PPROM at gestational ages between 24 + 0 and 36 + 6 weeks and 77 healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies, matched for gestational age at sampling without preterm birth, were included in this study. All women underwent evaluation of periodontal and oral hygiene status.

RESULTS:

Women with PPROM had higher gingival and plaque indexes in crude analysis (gingival index: median 0.80 versus 0.20; p < 0.0001; plaque index: median 0.80 versus 0.10; p < 0.0001), even after adjustment for smoking status (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001). Mean clinical attachment loss (CAL) and probing pocket depth (PPD) values were higher in women with PPROM in the crude analysis (CAL: median 2.3 mm versus 1.8 mm; p < 0.0001; PPD: median 2.3 mm versus 1.8; p < 0.0001), as well as after adjustment for smoking status (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Pregnant women with PPROM residing in central Europe had worse periodontal status than women with uncomplicated pregnancies.

KEYWORDS:

clinical attachment loss; gingival index; periodontitis; plaque index; preterm birth; probing pocket depth

PMID:
30638274
DOI:
10.1111/jcpe.13067

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