Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Sch Health. 2019 Mar;89(3):200-209. doi: 10.1111/josh.12729. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

School Food Environment, Food Consumption, and Indicators of Adiposity Among Students 7-14 Years in Bogotá, Colombia.

Author information

1
Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
2
The Greater Boston Food Bank, Boston, MA.
3
Community and Research Associate at The Greater Boston Food Bank, 70 South Bay Avenue, Boston, MA 02118.
4
Department of Global Health and Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.
5
Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, La Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
6
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
7
University of Ottawa, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Research Institute, Office R242, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L1, Canada.
8
Carrera 1 #18A-10, (8th floor), Edificio Q, Bogotá 111711, Colombia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Colombia, the prevalence of overweight/obesity in children has increased by 26% in the past 5 years. School food environment may be an important contributor and offers opportunities for effective intervention.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study among 7- to 14-year-old schoolchildren from 10 schools in Bogotá, Colombia. We examined the school food environment and the relationship of individual-level consumption, and physical activity with overweight/obesity, measured by body mass index and percentage body fat.

RESULTS:

Schools with a restaurant/store were characterized as having excessive unhealthy foods. In the sample of 714 schoolchildren, 17.5% were overweight and 10.5% were obese. In multivariate models, boys had significantly increased odds of being overweight/obese (odds ratio [OR]: 1.53; p = .01) as compared to girls. Schoolchildren who consumed a greater number of energy drinks (OR = 1.82; p = .04), and those who spent more than 3 hours per schoolday watching TV (OR = 1.53; p < .01) had increased odds of being overweight/obese.

CONCLUSIONS:

Approximately 1 in 4 schoolchildren were overweight/obese, with boys, energy drink consumers, and those with low physical activity having increased risk. School-based interventions focused on improving food options and providing health behavior education may be effective to reduce overweight among children in Bogotá and similar settings.

KEYWORDS:

child and adolescent health; international health; nutrition and diet; school food services

PMID:
30637735
DOI:
10.1111/josh.12729

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center