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Intern Emerg Med. 2019 Sep;14(6):835-842. doi: 10.1007/s11739-018-02023-x. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

E-cigarette use is strongly associated with recent smoking cessation: an analysis of a representative population sample in Greece.

Author information

1
Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Sygrou 356, Kallithea, 17674, Greece. kfarsalinos@gmail.com.
2
Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rio, 26500, Greece. kfarsalinos@gmail.com.
3
National School of Public Health, Alexandras Av. 196, Athens, 11521, Greece. kfarsalinos@gmail.com.
4
Public Opinion Research Unit, University of Macedonia, Egnatia 156, Thessaloniki, 54636, Greece.
5
Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rio, 26500, Greece.
6
Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Sygrou 356, Kallithea, 17674, Greece.
7
National School of Public Health, Alexandras Av. 196, Athens, 11521, Greece.

Abstract

The purpose was to examine the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation according to quit duration in Greece in 2017. A cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of adults living in Attica prefecture was performed in May 2017 through telephone interviews. The present analysis was confined to current and former smokers (n = 2568). Logistic regression analyses were performed with current and current daily e-cigarette use being the dependent variables and demographics and smoking status (current smokers vs smoking cessation for ≤ 12 months, 13-36 months, 36-72 months, and > 72 months) being independent variables. Almost half of former smokers (47.7%) had quit smoking for ≤ 72 months. Current e-cigarette use was more prevalent among former smokers of ≤ 12 months (26.2%) and 13-36 months (27.0%), and was rare among former smokers of > 72 months (1.0%). Current e-cigarette use was strongly associated with smoking cessation for ≤ 12 months (OR 6.12, 95% CI 4.11-9.10, P < 0.001) and 13-36 months (OR 6.28, 95% CI 4.25-9.28, P < 0.001). Current daily e-cigarette use was also strongly associated with smoking cessation for ≤ 12 months (OR 10.41, 95% CI 6.56-16.53, P < 0.001) and 13-36 months (OR 11.18, 95% CI 7.12-17.55, P < 0.001). Current and current daily e-cigarette use were not significantly associated with smoking cessation for 37-72 months, and were negatively associated with smoking cessation for > 72 months. Current and current daily e-cigarette use are strongly associated with recent smoking cessation in Greece, suggesting a positive public health impact in a country with the highest prevalence of smoking in the European Union. E-cigarettes do not appear to promote relapse in long term former smokers. Duration of smoking cessation and frequency of e-cigarette use should be taken into consideration when examining the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation in population studies.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic cigarettes; Greece; Nicotine; Smoking; Smoking cessation

PMID:
30637600
DOI:
10.1007/s11739-018-02023-x

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