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Environ Health. 2019 Jan 11;18(1):6. doi: 10.1186/s12940-019-0447-9.

Prenatal exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic field and its impact on fetal growth.

Author information

1
Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health and Management, Weifang Medical University, Shandong, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation of NPFPC, SIPPR, IRD, Fudan University, 779 Old Hu Min Road, Shanghai, 200237, China.
3
Department of Fetal Medicine and Prenatal Diagnosis Center, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200040, China.
4
Division of Research, Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California, USA.
5
Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation of NPFPC, SIPPR, IRD, Fudan University, 779 Old Hu Min Road, Shanghai, 200237, China. yuanwei11@yahoo.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Studies on the effect of prenatal exposure to magnetic field (MF) on fetal growth is inconclusive and subject to some methodological limitations, particularly in measurement of MF exposure. The present study aimed to examine the association between maternal extremely low frequency MF (ELF-MF) exposure during pregnancy and fetal growth in offspring.

METHODS:

A total of 128 pregnant women were recruited at their 3rd trimester and asked to wear an EMDEX Lite meter for 24ā€‰h to capture daily ELF-MF exposure. Time-weighted average (TWA), P50, and P75 of personal 24-h measurements were used to evaluate prenatal ELF-MF exposure. The medians of these measurements were used as cut-off points of high and low prenatal ELF-MF exposure. Fetal growth was measured by infant's birth weight, skinfold thickness of triceps, abdomen, and back, and circumference of head, upper arm, and abdomen. These measures were conducted within 24-h after birth. Generalized Linear Model was used to examine the association between maternal ELF-MF level and fetal growth indices after potential confounders were adjusted for.

RESULTS:

Compared with girls with lower prenatal ELF-MF exposure, girls with higher exposure had a lower birth weight, thinner skinfold of triceps, abdomen and back, and smaller circumference of head, upper arm and abdomen in all three ELF-MF matrices. The differences were statistically significant for birth weight and most other growth measurements (Pā€‰<ā€‰0.05). These measures had no significant difference between higher and lower prenatal ELF-MF exposure in boys except back skinfold thickness.

CONCLUSION:

Prenatal exposure to higher ELF-MF levels was associated with decreased fetal growth in girls, but not in boys.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort study; Fetal growth; Magnetic field; Pregnancy

PMID:
30635061
PMCID:
PMC6329146
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-019-0447-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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