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Nutr J. 2019 Jan 11;18(1):3. doi: 10.1186/s12937-019-0430-x.

Does diet strictness level during weekends and holiday periods influence 1-year follow-up weight loss maintenance? Evidence from the Portuguese Weight Control Registry.

Author information

1
Self-Regulation in Physical Activity, Nutrition and Obesity Research Group (PANO-SR), Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Human Performance (CIPER), Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Estrada da Costa, 1495-687, Cruz Quebrada, Portugal.
2
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, Quinta da Granja, 2829-511, Monte de Caparica, Portugal.
3
Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences (FCNA), University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465, Porto, Portugal.
4
Self-Regulation in Physical Activity, Nutrition and Obesity Research Group (PANO-SR), Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Human Performance (CIPER), Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Estrada da Costa, 1495-687, Cruz Quebrada, Portugal. isantos@fmh.ulisboa.pt.
5
Research Center in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure (CIAFEL), Faculty of Sports, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Plácido Costa, 91, 4200-450, Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

There is not much evidence about how diet strictness during weekends and holidays influence long-term weight loss maintenance. Our aim was to examine how dieting more or less strictly during weekends and holidays (vs. weekdays and non-holiday periods) influence weight loss maintenance.Participants (n = 108) from the Portuguese Weight Control Registry indicated whether they had a more or less strict diet regimen during weekends compared to weekdays. A similar question about holiday and non-holiday period' diet regimen was answered. Weight and height were measured at baseline and 1y follow-up. A 3% maximum weight variation defined participants as "non-regainers".General level on dieting strictness on weekends vs. weekdays (r = - 0.28, p < 0.01) and holidays vs. non-holidays (r = - 0.33, p < 0.001) predicted 1y weight change.Participants who reported being less strict on weekends (OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.15-0.81) were more likely to be non-regainers when compared with the ones who reported being more strict on weekends. Non-significant results were found during holidays (OR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.20-1.09).Adopting a less strict diet regimen during weekends, when compared to weekdays, was a behavioral strategy associated with long-term weight management in our sample.

KEYWORDS:

Diet strictness; Dieting; Holidays; Weekends; Weight loss maintenance

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