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Am J Clin Dermatol. 2019 Jun;20(3):335-344. doi: 10.1007/s40257-018-00417-3.

Acne, the Skin Microbiome, and Antibiotic Treatment.

Xu H1,2, Li H3,4.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 4339 CNSI, 570 Westwood Plaza, Building 114, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
2
Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
3
Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 4339 CNSI, 570 Westwood Plaza, Building 114, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. huiying@ucla.edu.
4
UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. huiying@ucla.edu.

Abstract

Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin disorder involving hair follicles and sebaceous glands. Multiple factors contribute to the disease, including skin microbes. The skin microbiome in the follicle is composed of a diverse group of microorganisms. Among them, Propionibacterium acnes and Malassezia spp. have been linked to acne development through their influence on sebum secretion, comedone formation, and inflammatory response. Antibiotics targeting P. acnes have been the mainstay in acne treatment for the past four decades. Among them, macrolides, clindamycin, and tetracyclines are the most widely prescribed. As antibiotic resistance becomes an increasing concern in clinical practice, understanding the skin microbiome associated with acne and the effects of antibiotic use on the skin commensals is highly relevant and critical to clinicians. In this review, we summarize recent studies of the composition and dynamics of the skin microbiome in acne and the effects of antibiotic treatment on skin microbes.

PMID:
30632097
PMCID:
PMC6534434
[Available on 2020-06-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s40257-018-00417-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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