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Open Forum Infect Dis. 2018 Dec 14;6(1):ofy351. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofy351. eCollection 2019 Jan.

The Role of Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole in the Treatment of Infections Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

Author information

1
Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
2
Department of Infectious Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
4
Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio.
5
Department of Medicine, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, Akron General Medical Center, Akron, Ohio.
8
Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.
9
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
10
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
11
The Biostatistics Center, The George Washington University, Rockville, Maryland.
12
Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
13
Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
14
Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio.
15
Departments of Pharmacology, Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio.
16
CWRU-Cleveland VAMC Center for Antimicrobial Resistance and Epidemiology (Case VA CARES), Cleveland, Ohio.
17
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

In the Consortium on Resistance Against Carbapenems in Klebsiella and other Enterobacteriaceae (CRACKLE), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) had a limited role in the treatment of less severe carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections, especially urinary tract infections. Of tested CRE, only 29% were susceptible to TMP-SMX. Development of resistance further limits the use of TMP-SMX in CRE infections.

KEYWORDS:

Klebsiella pneumonia; antimicrobial resistance; carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; urinary tract infection

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