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Psychiatr Serv. 2019 Mar 1;70(3):229-232. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201700565. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Tobacco Cessation Services in Addiction Treatment: What Do Clients Say?

Author information

1
Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco (UCSF) (Guydish, Yip, Le, Gubner, Williams); Department of Psychiatry, UCSF (Delucchi).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Specialty addiction programs treat people who are addicted to alcohol, opioids, stimulants, and other drugs. This study identified the proportion of addiction program clients who received tobacco-related services and factors associated with receipt of such services.

METHODS:

In 2015 and 2016, clients (N=2,119) in 24 programs were surveyed for receipt of services aligning with three of the five As of tobacco cessation: ask, advise, assist. Multivariate analyses examined factors associated with receipt of each service.

RESULTS:

Most clients (76%) were asked about smoking. Among smokers (N=1,630), 53% were advised to quit, 41% received counseling, 26% received cessation medication, and 17% received counseling and medication. Clients were more likely to receive tobacco-related services if they wanted help quitting smoking or were enrolled in programs with tobacco-free grounds.

CONCLUSIONS:

These correlational findings suggest that increasing client motivation to quit and implementing tobacco-free policies on the grounds of treatment centers may increase tobacco-related services in addiction treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Drug abuse; Public health; Tobacco cessation services; addiction treatment; psychopharmacology

PMID:
30630403
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ps.201700565

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