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J Infect Dis. 2019 May 24;219(12):2005-2014. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiz021.

Serum Metabolome Is Associated With the Nasopharyngeal Microbiota and Disease Severity Among Infants With Bronchiolitis.

Author information

1
Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
2
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Emerging evidence suggests relationships between the nasopharyngeal metabolome and both the microbiota and severity of bronchiolitis. However, the influence of host systemic metabolism on disease pathobiology remains unclear. We aimed to examine metabolome profiles and their association with more-severe disease, defined by use of positive pressure ventilation (PPV), in infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis.

METHODS:

In 140 infants with bronchiolitis, metabolomic profiling was performed on serum; samples from 70 were in a training data set, and samples from 70 were in an independent test data set. We also profiled the nasopharyngeal airway microbiota and examined its association with the serum metabolites.

RESULTS:

Serum metabolome profiles differed by bronchiolitis severity (P < .001). In total, 20 metabolites in the training data set were significantly associated with the risk of PPV, of which 18 remained significant following adjustment for confounders (false-discovery rate [FDR], < 0.10). Phosphatidylcholine metabolites were associated with higher risks of PPV use, while metabolites from the plasmalogen subpathway were associated with lower risks. The test data set validated these findings (FDR < 0.05). Streptococcus abundance was positively associated with metabolites that are associated with higher risks of PPV.

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum metabolomic signatures were associated with both the nasopharyngeal microbiota and the severity of bronchiolitis. Our findings advance research into the complex interrelations between the airway microbiome, host systemic response, and pathobiology of bronchiolitis.

KEYWORDS:

Bronchiolitis; metabolomics; microbiota; serum; severity

PMID:
30629185
PMCID:
PMC6534192
[Available on 2020-05-24]
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiz021

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