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Arch Microbiol. 2019 Jan 9. doi: 10.1007/s00203-019-01618-y. [Epub ahead of print]

Molecular identification of clinical and environmental avian Aspergillus isolates.

Author information

1
URSZ-Infectious Diseases Department, Nacional Institute of Health Dr. Ricardo Jorge, Av. Padre Cruz, 1649-016, Lisbon, Portugal. raquel.sabino@insa.min-saude.pt.
2
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Corvallis, OR, USA.
3
URSZ-Infectious Diseases Department, Nacional Institute of Health Dr. Ricardo Jorge, Av. Padre Cruz, 1649-016, Lisbon, Portugal.
4
Departamento de Ciências e Tecnologia da Biomassa, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
6
California Institute for Medical Research, San Jose, CA, USA.
7
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.

Abstract

Aspergillosis causes high morbidity and mortality in avian species. The main goal of this study was to use molecular techniques to identify Aspergillus species collected from different avian species with aspergillosis. A subsample of those isolates was also screened for resistance to itraconazole. Over a 2-year period, clinical samples were recovered from 44 birds with clinical signs of the disease, clinical pathology results suspicious of aspergillosis, or from birds that died from Aspergillus spp. infection. Environmental sampling was also performed in seabird rehabilitation centers and natural seabird environments. Seventy-seven isolates (43 clinical and 34 environmental) were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto. No cryptic species from the Fumigati section were detected. Two environmental isolates were identified as Aspergillus nidulans var. dentatus and Aspergillus spinulosporus. None of the Aspergillus isolates tested were resistant to itraconazole. Our study emphasizes the dominant association of Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto in avian mycoses and shows the lack of itraconazole resistance in the studied isolates.

KEYWORDS:

Aspergillosis; Aspergillus; Birds; Cryptic species; Drug susceptibility

PMID:
30627760
DOI:
10.1007/s00203-019-01618-y

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