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BMC Microbiol. 2019 Jan 9;19(1):9. doi: 10.1186/s12866-018-1379-1.

The effect of antimicrobial drug use on the composition of the genitourinary microbiota in an elderly population.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, 3000, CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Inspectorate of Health Care, PO Box 2518, 6401, DA, Heerlen, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, 3000, CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Rijnstate Hospital, PO Box 9555, 6800, TA, Arnhem, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, 3000, CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. b.stricker@erasmusmc.nl.
6
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, 3000, CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The urinary tract is inhabited by a diversity of microorganisms, known as the genitourinary microbiota. Here, we investigated the association between the use of antimicrobial drugs and the composition of the genitourinary microbiota.

RESULTS:

Clean-catch urinary samples were collected from 27 participants of the Rotterdam Study. Bacterial DNA was extracted and the 16S ribosomal RNA gene variable regions V3 and V4 were analyzed using Illumina sequencing. 23 of the 27 participants were included in the analysis. The population consisted of 10 men and 13 women with a mean age of 75 ± 3 years. The time between the last prescription of an antimicrobial drug and sampling was determined and categorized. The use of antimicrobial drugs prior to urine sampling was associated with statistically significant differences in the beta-diversity of the genitourinary microbiota. No association was found between antimicrobial drug use and the alpha-diversity of the genitourinary microbiota. Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) that were lowest in participants who used antimicrobial drug belonged to Lactobacillus and Finegoldia. In contrast, an OTU belonging to the genus Parabacteroides had higher abundances. Also, an OTU belonging to the species E.coli was higher in the participants who used antimicrobial drugs.

CONCLUSION:

Prior use of antimicrobial drugs is associated with a different composition of the genitourinary microbiota. Our results might indicate a persisting effect of antimicrobial drugs on the composition of the microbiota, but reverse causality cannot be ruled out. Future studies are needed to differentiate between two possibilities. Genitourinary dysbiosis could be the result of antimicrobial drug use or genitourinary dysbiosis could be a risk factor for urinary tract infections resulting in increased use of antimicrobial drugs. This may have important implications for treatment and prevention of (recurrent) UTIs.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial drug use; Genitourinary microbiota; Urinary tract infections

PMID:
30626324
PMCID:
PMC6327605
DOI:
10.1186/s12866-018-1379-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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