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AIDS Care. 2018;30(sup4):34-41. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2018.1511045. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

School connectedness as psychological resilience factor in children affected by HIV/AIDS.

Author information

1
a Department of Psychology , University of Houston , Houston , TX , USA.
2
b Center for Development Support , University of the Free State , Bloemfontein , South Africa.
3
c Unit for Research on Health and Society, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences , Stellenbosch University , Stellenbosch , South Africa.
4
d Department of HIV/AIDS, STIs, and TB , Human Sciences Research Council , Cape Town , South Africa.

Abstract

Children affected by HIV/AIDS are at high risk for poor mental health outcomes. Social and psychological connectedness to school has been identified as an important resilience factor for youth affected by adversity (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). School connectedness: Strategies for increasing protective factors among youth. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). Defined as "the belief by students that adults in the school care about their learning as well as about them as individuals" (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). School connectedness: Strategies for increasing protective factors among youth. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), school connectedness has been shown to be associated with higher academic performance, increased mental health, and quality of life. However, few studies have examined school connectedness in sub-Saharan Africa, and none have examined school connectedness in relation to mental health in children orphaned by HIV/AIDS. Further, existing studies have relied on self-report measures. Against this background, the aim of the current study was to examine orphan status, school connectedness, and their interaction in relation to child mental health by using a multimethod design. 750 children between the ages of 7-11, recruited through South African community-based organizations (224 AIDS/HIV orphans, 276 non-AIDS/HIV orphans, 250 non-orphans; 51.2% girls), completed measures of school connectedness; children, caregivers, and teachers reported on child well-being using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. AIDS/HIV and non-AIDS/HIV orphans reported lower school connectedness than non-orphans. However, results demonstrated significant relations between school connectedness and overall mental health regardless of group, suggesting that school connectedness buffers against negative mental health outcomes regardless of orphan status. This study identifies a strategic point of intervention to build resilience against the cascading effects of HIV/AIDS and poverty in children in sub-Saharan Africa.

KEYWORDS:

HIV/AIDS; children; mental health; orphans; resilience; school connectedness

PMID:
30626199
PMCID:
PMC6422750
[Available on 2020-01-09]
DOI:
10.1080/09540121.2018.1511045

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